6th Battalion, 56th Artillery (HAWK)
6th Bn 71st Arty Vietnam
            

 
     DISTINCTIVE UNIT INSIGNIA

 
       COAT OF ARMS

Distinctive Unit Insignia.  Description:   A Gold color metal and enamel device 1 1/8 inches (2.86 cm) in height overall blazoned as follows:  Gules, five high explosive projectiles palewise in chevron surmounted by three chevronels Or.  Attached below and to the sides of the insignia a Gold scroll inscribed “UNDIQUE VENIMUS” in Black letters.  

        Symbolism:   Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery.  The three chevronels from the coat of arms of John Winthrop, the founder of the Boston Colony, alludes to Boston, the area in which the unit was originally constituted and organized in 1918.  The five projectiles are symbolic of the unit’s five battle honors awarded for service in World War II.  They also commemorate the mission of the unit to attack and destroy enemy aircraft.  The motto translates to “We Come From All Parts).

        Background:   The distinctive unit insignia was originally approved for the 71st Artillery Regiment on 21 May 1959.  It was redesignated for the 71st Air Defense Artillery Regiment effective 1 September 1971.

 

Coat of Arms.

        Blazon:

                Shield:   Gules, five high explosive projectiles palewise in chevron surmounted by three chevronels Or.  

                Crest:   On a wreath of the colors Or and Gules a fixed searchlight Sable, glass Or charged with a fleur-de-lis Gules.

                Motto:   UNIDIQUE VENIMUS (We Come From All Parts).

        Symbolism:

              Shield:   Scarlet and yellow are the colors used for Artillery.  The three chevronels from the coat of arms of John Winthrop, the founder of the Boston Colony, alludes to Boston, the area in which the unit was originally constituted and organized in 1918.  The five projectiles are symbolic of the unit’s five battle honors awarded for service in World War II.  They also commemorate the mission of the unit to attack and destroy enemy aircraft.  

                Crest:   The fixed searchlight used in seacoast defense refers to the former mission of the Regiment as Coast Artillery.  The fleur-de-lis is for service in World War I.  

        Background:   The coat of arms was originally approved for the 71st Artillery Regiment on 21 May 1959.  It was redesignated for the 71st Air Defense Artillery Regiment effective 1 September 1971. 

History 6th Missile Battalion (HAWK), 71st Artillery

World War I

The 71st Regiment, Coast Artillery Corps, born under the command of Colonel Frank S. Long on 22 May 1918, was the father of the 71st Artillery Regiment. Soon after organization, elements were deployed as part of the coast defense Boston, Massachusetts.

The 71st Regiment had the distinction of being one of the few fully motorized, tractor drawn, 8-inch howitzer units in the world.

        

In addition to serving in the coastal defense of Boston, the 71st Regiment trained for overseas action. Within 2 months, the 71st Regiment sailed for Europe. The unit arrived in England in August 1918, the unit immediately embarked for Le Havre, France.

World War II

During the buildup of American Armed Forces prior to World War II, the 71st Regiment was again called to arms in the defense of the Free World.

The 71st Coast Artillery Regiment was mobilized in July 1940 and station at Fort Monroe, Virginia. In May 1942, the Regiment was redesigned the 71st Coast Artillery Regiment (Antiaircraft Artillery) (Semi-Mobile) and assigned to the Eastern Defense Command, Washington, D.C.

In 1943, the War Department reorganized the entire antiaircraft element of the Coast Artillery Corps. The 71st Antiaircraft Coast Artillery Regiment, with its fixed Tables of Organization, was replaced by a Group Headquarters and attached battalions.

In August 1943, the 1st Battalion, 71st Artillery Regiment (Antiaircraft Artillery) (Semi-Mobile), was designated the 71st Antiaircraft Artillery Group, and the 2nd Battalion was designated the 348th Antiaircraft (Automatic Weapons) Battalion.

The 71st Antiaircraft Group moved to Camp Palk, Louisiana, in January 1944 for extensive field exercises and training maneuvers. They arrived in England in August 1944 aboard the SS Aquitania. A month later, the Regiment crossed the English Channel and arrived in battle-torn France.

The 71st distinguished itself in five of the major campaigns of the European Theater of Operation. The Colors of the 71st Artillery were seen in the battles of Normandy and Northern France. Its guns exacted heavy tolls on the Luftwaffe during the Rhineland and Ardennes-Alsace campaigns. The fifth battle streamer was awarded for service in the Central Europe encounter.

The 71st Antiaircraft Artillery Group was deactivated on 4 March 1946 at Munich, Germany. The historic Colors of the 71st were returned to the United States to be stored in the inactive unit repository of the Adjutant General’s Department.

Post World War II

The 71st Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion was activated at Fort Bliss, Texas, in September 1949.

After intense training at Fort Bliss, the 71st Battalion was equipped with 120-millimeter guns and stationed at an antiaircraft site at Gum Springs, Virginia.

In July 1954, the battalion was reorganized as the 71st Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion. By autumn, all batters were operational as surface-to-air Nike fire units in the Washington-Baltimore area.

In September 1958, the 71st Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion was reorganized and designated the 1st Missile Battalion (Nike-Hercules), 71st Artillery, under the Combat Arms Regimental System.

The 71st Artillery regiment has the following elements on active duty:

            1st Missile Battalion, 71st Artillery, at Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

            2d Missile Battalion, 71st Artillery, in Korea

            3d Missile Battalion, 71st Artillery, in Europe

            4th Missile Battalion, 71st Artillery, at Fort Hancock, New Jersey

            6th Missile Battalion, 71st Artillery, at Fort Bliss, Texas

 

The 6th Missile Battalion (HAWK) 71st Artillery

 

The 6th Missile Battalion (HAWK), 71st Artillery was activated by General Order number 17, Headquarters, U.S. Army Air Defense Center, Fort Bliss, Texas, 19 February 1962, and organized under the revised TOE 44-235T, 60(mobile).

 

On 15 June 1962, a handful of officers and men signed in and formed the nucleus of this new unit under the command of lieutenant Colonel Herbert J. Childress, Jr.

 

The battalion completed its advanced individual training on 20 July 1962. The ensuing 10-week interim advance training program served to familiarize the men of the battalion with the fundamentals of Army operations.

The basic unit training phase instructed individuals in the operation of a tactical HAWK missile battalion. Advanced unit training, begin in January 1963, and drew upon all prior military training to mold a well-oiled fighting machine prepared for the army training test.

The Army training test is the payoff for peacetime training. It is designed to evaluate the ability of the unit to perform its assigned mission under simulated combat conditions and is highlighted by the firing of HAWK missiles by each battery.

Vietnam War

On 8 September 1965, the 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery (HAWK) departed Fort Bliss, Texas via train for Oakland, California. The Battalion departed Oakland, California aboard the USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey on 11 September 1965.

The following units departed Oakland, California aboard the USNS General Hugh J. Gaffey for Vietnam under the control of the 79th Artillery Group AD. As of 14 September 1965 the strength of the 97th Artillery Group AD was as follows:

           

Unit

Officers

WO

Enlisted

Total

79th Artillery Group AD

15

2

25

42

6th Bn.56th Artillery

40

15

745

800

6th Bn. 71st Artillery

40

15

723

778

79th Ordnance Detachment

1

2

39

42

 

The main body of the 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery debarked at Qui Nhon after 17 days aboard the USNS Gaffey on 28 September 1965.

 

After the unit’s arrival in Qui Nhon they were rationed on “B” type ration, no beer, soft drinks, fruit, or ice. The 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery could not obtain sandbags in the area. The unit was 87 personnel short and they had 41 cases of heat prostration. To maintain the unit in the area they had to rely on helicopter support.

 

In November 1965, Battery C, 71st Artillery became the first fully operational HAWK unit in Vietnam

 

In 1966 the battalion relocated to Cam Ranh Bay where it remained until departing Vietnam, 22 September 1968 for Fort Bliss, Texas.

 

In February 1967 the 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery received the award for distinguished service in Vietnam during the period September 1965 to July 1966. The unit was cited for their extraordinary perseverance, determination, and professional competence in providing air defense for the two Vietnamese port cities.

 

The battalion returned to Fort Bliss, Texas from a Vietnam after a three year tour in October 1968.

 

The 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery was inactivated at Fort Bliss, Texas in March 1970.

 

 

The Weapons of the 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery

The 71st Regiment, Coast Artillery Corps had the distinction of being one of the few fully motorized, tractor drawn, 8-inch howitzer in the world during World War I.

The 71st distinguished itself in five of the major campaigns of the European Theater of Operation in World War II. During its combat service, the 71st Artillery played an important role in the defeat of the mighty German Luftwaffe.

The 71st Antiaircraft Artillery Gun Battalion was activated at Fort Bliss, Texas, in September 1949. After intense training at Fort Bliss, the 71st Battalion was equipped with 120-millimetter guns and station at an antiaircraft site at Gum Springs, Virginia.

In September 1958, the 71st Antiaircraft Artillery missile Battalion was reorganized and designated the 1st Missile Battalion (Nike-Hercules), 71st Artillery.

The 6th missile Battalion (HAWK), 71st Artillery was activated by General Order number 17, Headquarters, U.S. Army Air Defense Center, Fort Bliss, Texas, 19 February 1962.

The 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery arrived in Vietnam, 29 September 1965 and was located first at Qui Nhon. In 1966 the battalion relocated to Cam Ranh Bay where it remained until departing Vietnam, 22 September 1968 for Fort Bliss, Texas.


 

                                                              8 Inch Howitzer World war I
                       
                                   37mm Gun, Battery G, 71st Coast Artillery (AA) WW2
 
                                   
                                  120-millimeter Gun Antiaircraft, Gun Springs, Virginia
 
                                                            Nike-Hercules Missile
 
                                                                         HAWK Missile


Serving with D 6/71 in Vietnam

by Glenn E. Strohl, 1Lt, US Army Artillery, VN 1965-66

I was XO of Battery D, 6/71 when it deployed from Ft. Bliss to Vietnam in the fall of 1965. Battalion commander was Colonel R. Prilliman and Capt. Taft C. Ring commanded Battery D. We went by train to Oakland, then to Vietnam with one night of shore leave at Naha, Okinawa on the way. The Battalion went ashore from our ship, the General Hugh S. Gaffey, at Qui Nhon in late September/early October where an advance party had cleared some land inland along Rt. 1, and there we sat for 2-3 weeks until the Army decided what to do with us. We were sitting ducks in a narrow valley with the entire battalion situated on no more that 2 or 3 acres of land. Most of our equipment remained aboard a transport ship during this time.

We then got orders to deploy to Cam Ranh Bay, and Capt. Ring went down with part of his unit, along with the battalion HC staff to recon for unit sites. I brought the rest of the battery personnel a few days later via C130. The plane was so packed that I ended up sitting on the Chaplain's lap in the navigator's position.

Battery D was the northern most Hawk battery on the Cam Ranh peninsula, and was also the first Army Hawk Battery to become operational in Vietnam. We later moved north to Nha Trang where we occupied hill (580 I believe) just south of the town, the airfield, and 5th Special Forces HQ. From our hill, we overlooked the seaside villa of the infamous Lady Nhu. In 1966, space was cleared at the top of Hon Tre Island which lay 3-4 km offshore from Nha Trang. I did one recon trip out to the island, and conferred with a local ARVN officer to try to determine whether the villagers on the island were friendly or VC. Although the ARVN officer claimed to have lived all his life in the area, he didn't even know the island had people living on it! I was XO of Battery D, 6/71 when it deployed from Ft. Bliss to Vietnam in the fall of 1965. Battalion commander was Colonel R. Prilliman and Capt. Taft C. Ring commanded Battery D. We went by train to Oakland, then to Vietnam with one night of shore leave at Naha, Okinawa on the way. The Battalion went ashore from our ship, the General Hugh S. Gaffey, at Qui Nhon in late September/early October where an advance party had cleared some land inland along Rt. 1, and there we sat for 2-3 weeks until the Army decided what to do with us. We were sitting ducks in a narrow valley with the entire battalion situated on no more that 2 or 3 acres of land. Most of our equipment remained aboard a transport ship during this time.

We then got orders to deploy to Cam Ranh Bay, and Capt. Ring went down with part of his unit, along with the battalion HC staff to recon for unit sites. I brought the rest of the battery personnel a few days later via C130. The plane was so packed that I ended up sitting on the Chaplain's lap in the navigator's position.

C Battery, 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery Moves to New Site

On 1 June 1966, Battery C, 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery moved from its initial position on the Cam Rhan Peninsula CP054323 to a new location at coordinates CP056316. The move which neither degraded nor improved the defense was required when the Air Force decided to construct an additional runway and expand its facilities. Headquarters 97th Artillery Group (AD), Operational Report for Quarterly Period Ending 31 July 1966, confidential

Aerial Re-supply for D Battery, 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery

During the period ending 31 July 1966 Eye Field Forces Vietnam (IFFV) at Nha Trang was assigned the mission of providing the 6th Bn, 71st Arty with on-call aerial re-supply transportation support. It transported maintenance personnel, parts and deadline equipment 24 hours per day between the Bn Hqs at Cam Ranh Bay and Btry D located at Nha Trang. Headquarters 97th Artillery Group (AD), Operational Report for Quarterly Period Ending 31 July 1966, confidential

Artillery Plotting

Headquarters 97th Artillery Group personnel assisted Air Force personnel at the 7th Air Force Control and Reporting Center (CRC) at Tan Son Nhut Air Base, and at the 7th Air Force Control and Reporting Post (CRP) on Hon Tre Island in plotting friendly artillery fires for the safe passage and protection of friendly aircraft. Headquarters 97th Artillery Group (AD), Operational Report for Quarterly Period Ending 30 April 1968, secret


A Battery, 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery (HAWK)  
over looking Cam Ranh Bay Air Base Vietnam

Bob Hope’s USO Christmas Show, Cam Ranh Bay 1965

For more than 50 years, Bob Hope entertained men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces at home and overseas, in peace and in war. At least 10,000,000 G.I.s benefited from his efforts:

World War II, Berlin Airlift and Korean War, Vietnam War, Beyond the Cold War

In 1983 Bob Hope spent Christmas with the American troops in Beirut, Lebanon, and seven Christmases later, he and his wife Dolores traveled to Saudi Arabia for the troops serving in Operation DESERT SHIELD/DESERT STORM.

Standoff Rocket/Mortar Attacks

There were no enemy ground attacks directed against units of the 79th Artillery Group (AD) during the reporting period ending 30 April 1968. However there were four standoff rocket/mortar attacks.

Date/Time

Unit

Type

Results

270530 Feb 68

HHB 97th Gp (AD)

1 round

122mm rkt

Negative casualties, minor damage to one building (senior enlisted quarters)

101925 Mar 68

Btry D, 6th Bn

71st Arty

12 rounds 60 and

88 mm mortar

Negative casualties, data cable destroyed, moderate damage to one building, minor damage to VHF van and 3 radars.

010140 Apr 68

Btry B, 6th Bn

71st Arty

2 rounds

122mm rkt

Negative casualties and damage

270315 Apr 68

79th Ord Det

2 rounds

122mm rkt

Negative casualties, minor damage to one building with destruction of $23,000 worth of repair parts.

Headquarters 97th Artillery Group (AD), Operational Report for Quarterly

 Period Ending 30 April 1968, secret


Incoming Mortar Rounds D Battery, 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery (HAWK)

The three batteries on Cam Ranh Bay peninsula experienced no enemy incidents during the period ending 30 April 1968. Battery C (Hon Tre Island) reported one incident and one sighting. An IFFV FAC sighted approximately 60 VC on the island on 5 March 1968. The unit was unable to make contact with this force due to heavy jungle. Battery D (Nha Trang) received approximately twenty three 60 and 81MM mortar rounds on 10 March 1968. Several rounds impacted among three of the battery radars causing only small damage. One round cause loss of VHS communications for approximately 45 minutes. One data cable was cut and several chassis were damaged in the maintenance building which received a direct hit. No personnel were injured during the attack. It is believed that the minor nature of the damages sustained were primarily the results of the 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery fortification program.

Operational Report for 6th Bn, 71st Arty period ending 30 April 1968, Confidential


Nha Trang Mortar/Rocket Attacks

D Battery, 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery home was in the Nha Trang area. On 15 May 1968, at approximately1830 hours, the Civic Action Team received automatic weapons, small arms, and grenade fire from an estimated platoon size enemy force at Dung Lac Valley, the 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery Civic Action Project. The fire fight lasted about twenty minutes. Gunships were called in to support. One member of the Civic Action Team was killed in action. The enemy casualties were unknown. The local Popular Forces and villagers did an outstanding job defending their village. The villagers reported that the VC did not return to the village since the incident. The Nha Trang area has received several rocket/mortar attacks during the reporting period ending 31 July 1968. It appears that the 18B North Vietnamese Army (NVA) Regiment was trying to recover from their TET losses, but Republic of Korea Army operations hampered their efforts.

Operational Report for 6th Bn, 71st Arty period ending 31 July 1968, Confidential


The Purple Heart Medal



Criteria Governs Award of the Purple Heart

The following criteria governs award of the Purple Heart in ALL branches of service, not just the United States Army. The text here is taken directly from AR 600-8-22, 25 February 1995 and Public Law 104-106 - Feb. 10, 1996 (sub-paragraphs have been indented to ease reading) AR 600-8-22 / 25 February 1995

SEC. 571. PURPLE HEART TO BE AWARDED ONLY TO MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES. 

(a) IN GENERAL.--(1) Chapter 57 of title 10, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new section: 

"§ 1131. Purple Heart: limitation to members of the armed forces 

"The decoration known as the Purple Heart (authorized to be awarded pursuant to Executive Order 11016) may only be awarded to a person who is a member of the armed forces at the time the person is killed or wounded under circumstances otherwise qualifying that person for award of the Purple Heart.".

(2) The table of sections at the beginning of such chapter is amended by adding at the end the following new item: 

"1131. Purple Heart: limitation to members of the armed forces.". 

(b) EFFECTIVE DATE.--Section 1131 of title 10, United States Code, as added by subsection (a), shall apply with respect to persons who are killed or wounded after the end of the 180-day period beginning on (18 Nov 1997) the date of the enactment of this Act.

2-8. Purple Heart 

The Purple Heart was established by General George Washington, at Newburgh, New York, on 7 August 1782, during the Revolutionary War. It was reestablished by the President of the United States per War Department General Orders 3, 1932 and is currently awarded pursuant to Executive Order 11016, 25 April 1962, Executive Order 12464, 23 February 1984 and Public Law 98-525, 19 October 1984. 

a. The Purple Heart is awarded in the name of the President of the United States to any member of an Armed Force or any civilian national of the United States who, while serving under competent authority in any capacity with one of the U.S. Armed Services after 5 April 1917, has been wounded or killed, or who has died or may hereafter die after being wounded 

(1) In any action against an enemy of the United States.

(2) In any action with an opposing armed force of a foreign country in which the Armed Forces of the United States are or have been engaged.

(3) While serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

(4) As a result of an act of any such enemy of opposing armed forces.

(5) As the result of an act of any hostile foreign force.

(6) After 28 March 1973, as a result of an international terrorist attack against the United States or a foreign nation friendly to the United States, recognized as such an attack by the Secretary of the Army, or jointly by the Secretaries of the separate armed Services concerned if persons from more than one service are wounded in the attack.

(7) After 28 March 1973, as a result of military operations while serving outside the territory of the United States as part of a peacekeeping force.

b. While clearly an individual decoration, the Purple Heart differs from all other decorations in that an individual is not "recommended" for the decoration; rather he or she is entitled to it upon meeting specific criteria.

(1) A Purple Heart is authorized for the first wound suffered under conditions indicated above, but for each subsequent award an Oak Leaf Cluster will be awarded to be worn on the medal or ribbon. Not more than one award will be made for more than one wound or injury received at the same instant or from the same missile, force, explosion, or agent.

(2) A wound is defined as an injury to any part of the body from an outside force or agent sustained under one or more of the conditions listed above A physical lesion is not required, however, the wound for which the award is made must have required treatment by a medical officer and records of medical treatment for wounds or injuries received in action must have been made a matter of official record.

(3) When contemplating an award of this decoration, the key issue that commanders must take into consideration is the degree to which the enemy caused the injury. The fact that the proposed recipient was participating in direct or indirect combat operations is a necessary prerequisite, but is not sole justification for award.

(4) Examples of enemy-related injuries which clearly justify award of the Purple Heart are as follows: 

(a) Injury caused by enemy bullet, shrapnel, or other projectile created by enemy action.

(b) Injury caused by enemy placed mine or trap.

(c) Injury caused by enemy released chemical, biological or nuclear agent.

(d) Injury caused by vehicle or aircraft accident resulting from enemy fire.

(e) Concussion injuries caused as a result of enemy generated explosions.

(5) Examples of injuries or wounds which clearly do not qualify for award of the Purple Heart are as follows:

(a) Frostbite or trench foot injuries.

(b) Heat stroke.

(c) Food poisoning not caused by enemy agents.

(d) Chemical, biological, or nuclear agents not released by the enemy.

(e) Battle fatigue.

(f) Disease not directly caused by enemy agents.

(g) Accidents, to include explosive, aircraft, vehicular, and other accidental wounding not related to or caused by enemy action.

(h) Self-inflicted wounds, except when in the heat of battle, and not involving gross negligence.

(i) Post traumatic stress disorders.

(j) Jump injuries not caused by enemy action.

(6) It is not intended that such a strict interpretation of the requirement for the wound or injury to be caused by direct result of hostile action be taken that it would preclude the award being made to deserving personnel. Commanders must also take into consideration, the circumstances surrounding an injury, even if it appears to meet the criteria. Note the following examples:

(a) In case such as an individual injured while making a parachute landing from an aircraft that had been brought down enemy fire; or, an individual injured as a result of a vehicle accident caused by enemy fire, the decision will be made in favor of the individual and the award will be made.

(b) Individuals wounded or killed as a result of "friendly fire" in the "heat of battle" will be awarded the Purple Heart as long as the "friendly" projectile or agent was released with the full intent of inflicting damage or destroying enemy troops or equipment.

(c) Individuals injured as a result of their own negligence; for example, driving or walking through an unauthorized area known to have been mined or placed off limits or searching for or picking up unexploded munitions as war souvenirs, will not be awarded the Purple Heart as they clearly were not injured as a result of enemy action, but rather by their own negligence.

c. A Purple Heart will be issued to the next of kin of each person entitled to a posthumous award. Issue will be made automatically by the Commanding General, PERSCOM, upon receiving a report of death indicating entitlement.

d. Upon written application to Commander, ARPERCEN, ATIN.- DAR-P-VSEA, 9700 Page Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63132-5200, award may be made to any member of the Army, who during World War 1, was awarded a Meritorious Service Citation Certificate signed by the Commander in Chief, American Expeditionary Forces, or who was authorized to wear wound chevrons. Posthumous awards to personnel who were killed or died of wounds after 5 April 1917 will be made to the appropriate next of kin upon application to the Commanding General, PERSCOM.

e. Any member of the Army who was awarded the Purple Heart for meritorious achievement or service, as opposed to wounds received in action, between 7 December 1941 and 22 September 1943, may apply for award of an appropriate decoration instead of the Purple Heart.

f. For those who became Prisoners of War after 25 April 1962, the Purple Heart will be awarded to individuals wounded while prisoners of foreign forces, upon submission by the individual to the Department of the U.S. Army of an affidavit that is supported by a statement from a witness, if this is possible. Documentation and inquiries Should be directed to Commander, PERSCOM, ATTN: TAPCPDA, Alexandria, VA 22332-0471.

g. Any member of the U.S. Army who believes that he or she is eligible for the Purple Heart, but through unusual circumstances no award was made, may submit an application through military channels, to Commander, PERSCOM, ATTN: TAPC-PDA, Alexandria, VA 22332-0471. Application will include complete documentation, to include evidence of medical treatment, pertaining to the wound.

PUBLIC LAW 104-106 - FEB. 10, 1996

SEC. 621. AWARD OF PURPLE HEART TO PERSONS WOUNDED WHILE HELD AS PRISONERS OF WAR BEFORE APRIL 2G, 1962. 

(a) AWARD OF PURPLE HEART.—For purposes of the award of the Purple Heart, the Secretary concerned (as defined in section 101 of title 10, United States Code) shall treat a former prisoner of war who was wounded before April 25, 1962, while held as a prisoner of war (or while being taken captive) in the same manner as a former prisoner of war who is wounded on or after that date while held as a prisoner of war (or while being taken captive). 

(b) STANDARDS FOR AWARD.—An award of the Purple Heart under subsection (a) shall be made in accordance with the standards in effect on the date of the enactment of this Act for the award of the Purple Heart to persons wounded on or after April 25, 1962.

(C) ELIGIBLE FORMER PRISONERS OF WAR.—A person shall be considered to be a former prisoner of war for purposes of this section if the person is eligible for the prisoner-of-war meda1 under section 1128 of title 10, United States Code.

Soldiers of the 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery Awarded the Purple Heart in Vietnam

 Name                                                    Battery                          Date of  Action                                             
 Sp5 Robert I. Burkell  Battery C                 9 Dec 1967
 SP5 Fred A. Melton Battery C   9 Dec 1967
 SSG Norman C. Brubaker  Battery D  KIA 15 May 1968, Ninh Thuan Province, South Vietnam
 Sp4 Kenneth Poling  Battery A  Died, Khanh Hoa Province, South Vietnam
     

As of 31 January 1967, Batteries of the 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery were located

The 6th Battalion, 71st Artillery deployed in a defensive posture in the Cam Ranh Bay/Nha Trang area, Republic of Vietnam.

Battery

Coordinate

Headquarters and Headquarters Battery

CP093239

A Battery

CP107223

B Battery

CP081241

C Battery

CP054323

D Battery

CP057495


Hawk missile battery October 1967 Cam Ranh Bay Vietnam

6th Battalion, 71st Artillery Prepares for Deployment to CONUS

OPRD 60-69: 6th Bn, 71st arty prepares for overseas shipment and deploy from RVN to CONUS NLT 31 Oct 68.

a.       6th Bn, 71st Arty was released from its air defense mission in the Nha Trang/Cam Ranh Bay areas 241600Z Aug 68.

b.      Btry C and D from Nha Trang/Hon Tre Island staged at Cam Ranh Bay 28 and 29 Sept 68.

c.       The first elements of the 6th Bn, 71st Arty began loading equipment 041100Z Oct 68. Loading was completed 8 Oct, with the ship departing 0802272 Oct 68 for Oakland Army Terminal. Arrival date of equipment at Oakland NLT 31 Oct 68.

d.      Personnel were airlifted from Cam Ranh Bay to El Paso International Terminal; the first flight departed 9 Oct 68 and the final flight on 13 Oct 68, closing Fort Bliss, Texas 13 Oct 68.

e.       Per 97th Arty Gp CO 22, dated 26 Sept 68 (and in accordance with USARV secret message 200571, DTG 230100Z Sep 68), 6th Bn, 71st Arty was relieved from USARV upon embarkation and assigned to USARPAC, and upon debarkation, assigned to USCCNARC.

Headquarters 97th Artillery Group (AD), Operational Report for Quarterly Period Ending 25 October 1968, secret

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